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High-wire star Nik Wallenda to walk over Buffalo campus
AP

High-wire star Nik Wallenda to walk over Buffalo campus

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High-wire star Nik Wallenda to walk over Buffalo campus

FILE - In this June 15, 2012 file photo, Nik Wallenda walks over Niagara Falls on a tightrope in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Wallenda, the great grandson of Karl Wallenda, is scheduled to help open a college's new health clinic next week by walking a wire over its Buffalo campus. The June 17, 2021 event will mark the opening of D’Youville College’s Health Professions Hub.

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — High-wire star Nik Wallenda is scheduled to help open a college's new health clinic next week by walking a wire over the college's Buffalo campus.

The June 17 event will mark the opening of D'Youville College's Health Professions Hub.

Wallenda most famously performed in western New York in 2012, when he walked over Niagara Falls on a wire in a live televised event.

D’Youville is a small private university with about 3,000 full- and part-time students. Officials say the new health clinic will serve the city's west side while letting students gain clinical experience.

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